Brighton and Hove Revisited

Queens Place/London Road

By Jennifer Drury

Photo:Nag's Head, Queens Place c1914/18

Nag's Head, Queens Place c1914/18

Image reproduced with kind permission of The Regency Society and The James Gray Collection

Nag's Head public house

This was the Nag’s Head Public House, at the west corner of Queens Place. Period unknown but perhaps just before the 1914 - 1918 war. The inn had a fairly long life. Built as an inn in the late 1830s it remained licensed premises until 1921 when it was bought by Corbin's of London Road and taken into their business. 

Photo:Queens Place photographed in 2015

Queens Place photographed in 2015

┬ęTony Mould: images copyright protected

This page was added on 14/03/2015.
Comments about this page

Before it became the Halifax it was the Prince of Wales Pub and the sign depicting the three feathers hung from the wooden bar still shown above the shop. Anyone got a picture? I'm sure this site would love one!

By Geoff Wells (28/08/2016)

There is an error in the description of this picture in the James Gray collection - it is not the Nag's Head, as Geoff correctly says, it is the Prince of Wales. The Nag's Head stood at number 11 and 12 Queens Place on the corner behind the building shown, which is 143, London Road. The original Nags Head was taken over by Corbin's between 1922 and 1923 to be used as a decorator's warehouse and I believe the building that now stands on the site is a more modern replacement to match those on the opposite corner. The Prince of Wales shown in the pictures, had co-existed with the Nags Head since at least the 1850s and continued some while after the latter was closed down.

By Andy Grant (31/08/2016)

My wife's grandparents ran this pub in the 1940-50s. There names were Jesse and Alf Barnard.

By Dean Ball (01/09/2016)

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