S. S. Brighton

Benny Lee and Staff - 1960

By Steven Booth

This is a photo of Benny Lee and his staff outside the steps of the Sports Stadium, West Street, Brighton in 1960.

From left to right are:

Bill Gentry (General Manager)

Eileen Whybrow (Secretary to Mr. Lee)

Benny Lee

Alan Weeks (Publicity Manager and Sports Commentator)

(My Aunt, Eileen Whybrow, had saved this memory picture)

 

Photo:Benny Lee and his staff outside the steps of the Sports Stadium, West Street, Brighton in 1960.

Benny Lee and his staff outside the steps of the Sports Stadium, West Street, Brighton in 1960.

From the private collection of Stephen Booth

This page was added on 11/06/2011.
Comments about this page

I used to go ice skating there about that time, when I was 11. I was in Brighton last year and I think it's gone now. As I remember it was on Saturday mornings, happy times. One of my teachers used to go from Margaret Hardy as well.

By Anne Newman (12/06/2011)

If like me you were a teenager in the late 1950s/early 60s The Sports Stadium was for many a second home especially at weekends, skating on Saturday evenings, again on Sunday afternoons, then cheer The Tigers on in the evening. We would be back on the ice after the hockey the only problem was it was like skating across a ploughed field after the Tigers had finished playing. I recall Mr Gentry as looking a bit like a Sergeant Major, if he walked passed, you would feel inclined to salute him. Alan Weeks was a really nice man! Known as the voice of the Sports Stadium. Of course later on he was better known as a BBC sports commenator. Benny Lee was the Boss, a very shrewd and clever promoter, particuarly in ice hockey circles. I don't remember the attractive lady. However, I'm sure she kept those three chaps in order! The photo also shows Maynards sweet shop next to the rink. Just look at those tempting jars of sweets, sherbet lemons, pear drops, Maynards wine gums - I remember other goodies in the shop like stacks of pink and white coconut ice half covered with dark chocolate; in 1960 all could be purchased for a few pence. Those days seem like another lifetime away now.

By Christopher Wrapson (14/06/2011)

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