Twittens

Crown Gardens

By Jennifer Drury

This is a narrow twitten which runs from Church Street to North Road, and is lined with bow-windowed cottages behind small gardens. Despite its location, Crown Gardens actually lies in the Clifton Hill conservation area.

Crown Gardens dates from the 1820s and is said to have been built for employees at the Royal Pavilion and royal stables.

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Photo:Entrance to Crown Gardens from Church Street

Entrance to Crown Gardens from Church Street

Photo by Tony Mould

Photo:Crown Gardens

Crown Gardens

Photo by Tony Mould


Photo:Crown Gardens

Crown Gardens

Photo by Tony Mould

Photo:Entrance to Crown Gardens from North Road

Entrance to Crown Gardens from North Road

Photo by Tony Mould



Photo:Crown Gardens

Crown Gardens

Reproduced from Google maps

This page was added on 18/09/2011.
Comments about this page

When I was born in 1949 I lived at 1 Crown Gardens. It was nothing like what it is today. It had a tiny yard with an outside toilet. There was a bath in the kitchen which had boards across it to make it a sort of table when not in use. One Christmas, my dad was putting decorations up when the chair he was standing on went though the rotten floor boards. The landlord had the floor concreted, that was hard when I played with my toys!

By Kevin Theobald (21/03/2013)

In the 1950s at the Church Road end of Crown Gardens, on the corner, was The Shell Guest House and a few yards down from there was a small grocers shop. Mum often sent me in there to get her a packet of 5 Woodbines, or a pint of milk etc. I don't think a small child would be served with cigarettes today!

By Kevin Theobald (26/03/2013)

I spent many happy years of my childhood living at 19 Crown Gardens - the large house at the North Gardens end of Crown Gardens. It was nicknamed the 'wedge of cheese house' owing to it's peculiar shape. We were told at the time that it was around 230 years old, but don't know how true this is. My parents rented it to begin with, but then persuaded their landlord, Mr Cohen, to sell it to them. He was reluctant at first because it had been his childhood home. They eventually bought it for £6,000 and sold it for £15,000 in 1977. It's currently worth in excess of half a million!

By Ruth Bolton (12/06/2013)

My father lived at 2 Crown Gardens, he was born in 1930 and lived there till he was about 19. He lived there with his mother, Minnie M. Spicer and her parents, George and Minnie Spicer. His name was John Spicer. I looked them up in the 1911 census. I read Kevin Theobald's comments he said he lived at no. 1 Crown Gardens, and I was wondering what years he lived there. If you read this could you e-mail me? I am working on my family history and I'm always trying to find my family. 

By Diana Erekson (29/05/2016)

I lived in No.20 Crown Gardens from 1939 to about 1958. My brother Derek was born in the front room in 1941. Mr and Mrs Davies lived in No.19. He had a high up position in the newspaper business, my mother did cleaning for Mrs Davies for a number of years. Good memories... The pub next door on the corner was a place of many parties during the war.

By Raymond Pickett (18/11/2016)

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