Blackman Street

We all sat under the table

My brothers became worried about me living in Blackman Street because it was so near the station, and they thought the station would be bombed. They helped me put a blackout up and I moved out to Carden Avenue with my brother and sister-in-law for one night, but I returned the next day because my sister-in-law didn't make us welcome. Carden Avenue was then bombed, so we would have been no safer. I moved in with my mother in St. Mary Magdalene Street for a while, but that area was bombed. We returned to Blackman Street and we all sat under the table when there was a raid, but my nerves became very bad.

We lost our boy Bert in 1944, not through the war, but we just found him dead one morning. They never told us what it was, but I think it was hushed up, because he caught something which they didn't want known. We went to the Army, Navy and Airforce Society for help with the funeral, but all they did was send an undertaker round who made the funeral costs just over what we had in insurance. We paid ld a week for a child in those days and there was a limit on what you could claim. We had to pay the balance off weekly for his funeral. So much for help.

Reproduced with permission from 'Back Street Brighton' published by QueenSpark Books and the Lewis Cohen Urban Studies Centre
This page was added on 04/11/2006.

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